ANCIENT SEAS AND OCEANA

The prehistoric movement of our human ancestors as they gradually spread around the world, developing specialist tools, creating art, music and social structures and creating permanent settlements has always been accompanied by artistic interpretation of our environment and experiences. The adornment of our bodies, our tools and other objects based on rituals and symbolism meant we were able to communicate not just with those known to us, but also with other groups of humans – sharing information and knowledge through the use of a mark, a shape, a pattern - creating social networks. Our ancestors, both near and distant, used these skills to change the natural world to suit them, farming and utilising natural resources which began to have a profound effect on the landscape. While this was going on above the surface, the effects were also being felt below the surface.

Today we have an awareness of our effect on the environment and are reminded that we are also responsible for the wellbeing of our oceans and seas.

Thinking about the aesthetics of decorative art and objects of early human activity bordering our Seas and Oceans, this body of abstract artwork considers the beauty of a world beneath the surface, one that is on the verge of being damaged beyond repair.

Colours, textures and additions to convey a variety of species and sensations: colours, shapes and textures of the entirety; markings from fish, mammals and reptiles, plant life and also geological features. Veins of red running through to convey the geological turmoil of shifting tectonic plates, underwater volcanos, hot molten lava flowing from the earth and being cooled by the water, rising, falling, breaking down, building up;   life bursting forth and thriving, scattering, coming together and scattering once more. Diverse creatures imagined and unimagined, known and unknown - living beneath the surface, interconnected and interdependent. This is the fragile life-force of the planet, the heart and lungs, balance and harmony sustaining all life on earth from the smallest micro-organisms to the largest mammals.


Oceana blue fins    

A 30cm x 30cm decorative fused glass art panel which can be displayed either wall mounted or in a freestanding display (shown here in a black cast iron frame).  

A close look - fins and flippers, fluid energy, heat, building blocks, sea bed.  A very abstract representation of different elements – the subtle effect of the movement of water across surfaces, erosion and energy; the inhabitants represented by the fins in turquoise.  The textures within the glass respond to light sources, whether changes in natural  daylight or from artificial light sources, bouncing and diverting light creating reflections and illuminating the glass within the piece.  

Oceana Blue I From Above

A 30cm x 30cm decorative fused glass art panel which can be displayed either wall mounted or in a freestanding display (shown here in a black cast iron frame).    Turquoise waves evident on the sea, a change in viewpoint shows molten lava flowing between tectonic plates. Geological features in the grey hinting at a fractured crust; loose liquid mud like a gentle ooze in the light plum; heat and energy vibrating through the hot orange. The textures on the back of the glass causing a subtle bending of light passing through to add movement and energy. The textures within the glass respond to light sources, whether changes in natural daylight or from artificial light sources, bouncing and diverting light creating reflections and illuminating the glass within the piece.

Oceana Blue II Aracana Ornata

A 30cm x 30cm decorative fused glass art panel which can be displayed either wall mounted or in a freestanding display (shown here in a black cast iron frame). Turquoise waters,  seabed, a change in viewpoint - organic matter, eggs, organisms, primordial ooze, liquid mud - the beginning of life.  The textures on the back of the glass causing a subtle bending of light passing through to add movement and energy. The textures within the glass respond to light sources, whether changes in natural daylight or from artificial light sources, bouncing and diverting light creating reflections and illuminating the glass within the piece.